Accredited Private School, Grades 6-12
Enroll for Summer School / SY 2018-19


Curriculum

Choose from More Than 80 Courses for Credit

Students can complete a wide variety of 6th- to 12th-grade courses at Brightmont Academy for original credit or credit recovery. With our effective, one-to-one instruction, students experience fully personalized pacing, instructional materials, and motivators.

Brightmont partners with local schools to simplify the credit transfer process and, as needed, tailor the curriculum to match specific school and district requirements. This includes courses designed to align with the Common Core standards.

*Some courses are available at select campuses only. Please contact your local campus for availability.

Full Course Catalog

English

The following courses are offered for up to 1.0 credit unless otherwise specified.

  • Language Arts 6
    Language Arts 6 covers novels, poetry, and non-fiction texts; students explore elements of literature and the tools of writers. Students start developing the skills of analyzing both informational and literary texts. They keep an interactive journal, engage in 'quick writes' to build fluency and confidence, and hone their skills as young essay writers - all the while improving both critical thinking and original expression.

  • Language Arts 7
    Language Arts 7 focuses on the writing process. Students practice these essay forms: personal, compare-contrast, persuasive and literary analysis as well as review cause & effect, classification & division and process paragraph writing. Students apply active reading strategie to the study of poetry, non-fiction and fiction, including the reading of two novels. The learn to think of expression in terms of entering a conversation in which the ideas of others are considered and responded to.

  • Language Arts 8
    In Language Arts 8, students develop their facility with written expression, writing expository essays, formal arguments, and creative works. They build a writer's portfolio. They develop media literacy and analyze media texts from a variety of sources. They explore 'spoken word" and performance poetry as well read several contemporary classics of literature.

  • English 92
    The English 9 course is an overview of exemplar selections of literature in fiction and nonfiction genres. Students read short stories, poems, a full-length novel, and a full-length Shakespeare play, analyzing the use of elements of literature in developing character, plot, and theme. Each unit includes informational texts inviting students to consider the historical, social, and literary context of the main texts they study. The range of texts includes canonical authors such as William Shakespeare, Franz Kafka, and Elie Wiesel, as well as writers from diverse backgrounds, such as Alice Walker, Li-Young Lee, and Robert Lake-Thom (Medicine Grizzlybear).

  • English 102
    The focus of the English 10 course is the writing process. Three writing applications guide the curriculum: persuasive, expository, and narrative writing. Each lesson culminates in a written assignment that lets students demonstrate their developing skill in one of these applications. English 10 also continues to develop students' reading, listening, and speaking skills. Readings include poems, stories, speeches, plays, and a graphic novel, as well as a variety of informational texts. The readings represent a wide variety of purposes and cultural perspectives, ranging from the Indian epic The Ramayana to accounts of Hurricane Katrina told through different media.

  • English 112
    In the English 11 course, students examine the belief systems, events, and literature that have shaped the United States. They begin by studying the language of independence and the system of government developed by Thomas Jefferson and other enlightened thinkers. Next, they explore how the Romantics and Transcendentalists emphasized the power and responsibility of the individual in both supporting and questioning the government. Students consider whether the American Dream is still achievable and examine the Modernists’ disillusionment with the idea that America is a "land of opportunity." Reading the words of Frederick Douglass and the text of the Civil Rights Act, students look carefully at the experience of African Americans and their struggle to achieve equal rights. Students explore how individuals cope with the influence of war and cultural tensions while trying to build and secure their own personal identity. Finally, students examine how technology is affecting our contemporary experience of freedom: Will we eventually change our beliefs about what it means to be an independent human being?

  • English 122
    The English 12 course asks students to closely analyze British literature and world literature and consider how we humans define and interact with the unknown, the monstrous, and the heroic. In the epic poems The Odyssey, Beowulf, and The Inferno, in Shakespeare’s Tempest, in the satire of Swift, and in the rhetoric of World War II, students examine how the ideas of “heroic” and “monstrous” have been defined across cultures and time periods and how the treatment of the “other” can make monsters or heroes of us all. Reading Frankenstein and works from those who experienced the imperialism of the British Empire, students explore the notion of inner monstrosity and consider how the dominant culture can be seen as monstrous in its ostensibly heroic goal of enlightening the world.

  • Creative Writing1
    Creative Writing focuses on the exploration of short fiction and poetry, culminating in a written portfolio that includes a revised short story and 3-5 polished poems. Elements of fiction writing explored in this course include attention to detail, observation, character development, setting, plot, and point of view. In addition to applying literary craft elements in guided creative writing exercises, students engage in critical reading activities designed to illustrate the writing craft of a diverse group of authors.

  • Media Literacy1
    Media Literacy teaches students how to build the critical thinking, writing, and reading skills required in a media-rich and increasingly technocentric world. A major topic in the course is non-traditional media reading skills, including how to approach, analyze, and respond to advertisements, blogs, websites, social media, news media, and wikis. Students also engage in a variety of writing activities in non-traditional media genres, such as blogging and podcast scripting. Students consider their positions as consumers of media and explore ways to use non-traditional media to become more active and thoughtful citizens.

1Course is 0.5 credit
2Common Core Aligned

Math

The following courses are offered for up to 1.0 credit unless otherwise specified.

  • Math 6
    Math 6 introduces students to the order of operations, negative numbers, absolute value, and inequalities. They learn factoring fraction and decimal operations, ratio and percents. Students demonstrate knowledge through mathematical investigations, projects and problem sets.

  • Math 7
    Math 7 focuses on integer operations, rates, ration & proportion, one-step and multi-step equations. Students complete a statistics project using box and whisker plots. The also undertake a unit rate project to determine best value at the grocery story. Problem sets and mathematical investigations are incorporated throughout the course.

  • Pre-Algebra
    Introductory Algebra provides a curriculum focused on foundational concepts that prepare students for success in Algebra I. Through a "Discovery-Confirmation-Practice"-based exploration students are challenged to work toward a mastery of computational skills, to deepen their understanding of key ideas and solution strategies, and to extend their knowledge through a variety of problem-solving applications. Course topics include the language of algebra; solving equations with addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division; fractions and decimals; measurement; exponents; solving equations with roots and powers; multi-step equations; and linear equations.

  • Algebra I2
    Algebra I offers students the opportunity to develop and apply their algebraic understanding to solve increasingly complex problems. Students become familiar with exponents, roots, and radicals in the context of manipulating and factoring polynomials. They learn to write and solve systems of equations as a strategy for solving word problems. Students evaluate rational expressions, and graph, solve, and apply linear equations and inequalities. They also explore problems of probability.

  • Geometry2
    Geometry builds upon students' command of geometric relationships and formulating mathematical arguments. Students learn through discovery and application, developing the skills they need to break down complex challenges and demonstrate their knowledge in new situations.Course topics include reasoning, proof, and the creation of sound mathematical arguments; points, lines, and angles; triangles and trigonometry; quadrilaterals and other polygons; circles; congruence, similarity, transformations, and constructions; coordinate geometry; three-dimensional solids; and applications of probability.This course supports all students as they develop computational fluency and deepen conceptual understanding. Students begin each lesson by discovering new concepts through guided instruction, and then confirm their understanding in an interactive, feedback-rich environment. Modeling activities equip students with tools for analyzing a variety of real-world scenarios and mathematical ideas. Journaling activities allow students to reason abstractly and quantitatively, construct arguments, critique reasoning, and communicate precisely. Performance tasks prepare students to synthesize their knowledge in novel, real-world scenarios and require that they make sense of multifaceted problems and persevere in solving them.
  • Algebra II/Trigonometry2
    Algebra II/Trigonometry introduces students to powerful algebraic tools and problem-solving strategies. Students learn strategies for simplifying and solving equations and inequalities containing radical expressions. Students explore multiple techniques for solving systems of equations and are introduced to matrices. The quadratic formula and other methods of solving quadratic equations are introduced and applied. Students explore connections between algebra and geometry as they graph the equations of conic sections: parabolas, circles, ellipses, and hyperbolas. This course also includes an introduction to the concepts of trigonometry and an investigation of discrete mathematics and probability.
  • Integrated Math I2
    Integrated Math I provides a first-year integrated math curriculum that combines material traditionally covered in high school algebra, geometry, and statistics courses. Within the course, a balance is struck between task-based discovery and focused development of skills and conceptual understanding. Course topics include function families, propositional logic, polynomials and factoring, similarity and congruence properties of triangles, introductory probability and statistics, square roots, rational expressions, and coordinate geometry.

  • Integrated Math II2
    Integrated Math II provides a second-year integrated math curriculum that combines material traditionally covered in high school algebra, geometry, and precalculus courses. The course develops rigorous mathematical skills while emphasizing real-world applications. Course topics include complex numbers, step and piecewise functions, exponential functions, quadratic functions, inverse functions, right triangles, trigonometric functions, and circles, as well as data analysis and modeling.

  • Integrated Math III2
    Integrated Math III introduces students to powerful algebraic tools and problem-solving strategies. Students learn strategies for simplifying and solving equations and inequalities containing radical expressions. Students explore multiple techniques for solving systems of equations and are introduced to matrices. The quadratic formula and other methods of solving quadratic equations are introduced and applied. Students explore connections between algebra and geometry as they graph the equations of conic sections: parabolas, circles, ellipses, and hyperbolas. This course also includes an introduction to the concepts of trigonometry and an investigation of discrete mathematics and probability.

  • Pre-Calculus
    Pre-Calculus is a course that combines reviews of algebra, geometry, and functions into a preparatory course for calculus. The course focuses on the mastery of critical skills and exposure to new skills necessary for success in subsequent math courses. The first semester includes linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, radical, polynomial, and rational functions, as well as systems of equations and conic sections. The second semester covers trigonometric ratios and functions; inverse trigonometric functions; applications of trigonometry, including vectors and the laws of sines and cosines; polar functions and notation; and arithmetic of complex numbers.

  • Probability & Introduction to Statistics1
    Probability & Introduction to Statistics provides a curriculum focused on understanding key data analysis and probabilistic concepts, calculations, and relevance to real-world applications. This course covers topics such as types of data, common methods used to collect data, and the various representations of data, including histograms, bar graphs, box plots, and scatterplots. Students learn to work with data by analyzing and employing methods of prediction, specifically involving samples, populations, distributions, summary statistics, regression analysis, transformations, simulations, and inference.

  • Mathematics of Personal Finance
    Mathematics of Personal Finance focuses on real-world financial literacy, personal finance, and business subjects. Students apply what they learned in Algebra I and Geometry to topics such as personal income, taxes, checking and savings accounts, credit, loans and payments, car leasing and purchasing, home mortgages, stocks, insurance, and retirement planning. Students also extend their investigations using more advanced mathematics, such as systems of equations when studying cost and profit issues and exponential functions when calculating interest problems.

  • Liberal Arts Mathematics II2
  • Liberal Arts Mathematics II addresses the need for a course that meets graduation requirements and focuses on reinforcing, deepening, and extending a student's mathematical understanding. Liberal Arts Mathematics II starts with a review of algebraic concepts before moving on to a variety of key algebraic, geometric, statistical and probability concepts. Throughout the course, students hone their computational skills and extend their knowledge through problem solving and real-world applications.
    Course topics include analysis of quadratic, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions, arithmetic and geometric sequences, trigonometry and trigonometric functions, coordinate geometry and proofs, statistical analysis, experimental design and applications of probability.
    Within each Liberal Arts Mathematics II lesson, students are supplied with a scaffolded note-taking guide, called a Study Sheet, and are given ample opportunity to practice computations in low-stakes Checkup activities before moving on to formal assessment. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to formulate and justify conclusions as they extend and apply concepts through printable exercises and "in-your-own-words" interactive activities.
    To assist students for whom language presents a barrier to learning or who are not reading at grade level, Liberal Arts Math II includes audio resources in English.

  • Financial Literacy1
    Financial Literacy helps students recognize and develop vital skills that connect life and career goals with personalized strategies and milestone-based action plans. Students explore concepts and work toward mastery of personal finance skills, deepening their understanding of key ideas and extending their knowledge in a variety of problem-solving applications. Course topics include career planning; income, taxation, and budgeting; savings accounts, checking accounts, and electronic banking; interest, investments, and stocks; cash, debit, credit, and credit scores; insurance; and consumer advice on how to buy a car or a house, including buying, renting, and leasing options.

1Course is 0.5 credit
2Common Core Aligned

Science

The following courses are offered for up to 1.0 credit unless otherwise specified.

  • Life Science
    Life science focuses on basic biological concepts while developing a foundation in scientific inquiry. Students learn about the nature of science before beginning an exploration of themes such as states of matter, biological systems, relationships among organisms, energy in ecosystems, agricultural and biomechanical engineering. Students wrap up the course by completing an original engineering project. Students complete hands on labs throughout the course.
  • Earth Science
    Earth Science offers a focused curriculum that explores Earth's composition, structure, processes, and history; its atmosphere, freshwater, and oceans; and its environment in space. Course topics include an exploration of the major cycles that affect every aspect of life, including weather, climate, air movement, tectonics, volcanic eruptions, rocks, minerals, geologic history, Earth's environment, sustainability, and energy resources. Students complete hands on labs throughout the course.

  • Physical Science
    Physical Science focuses on the mastery of important scientific skills through the study of concepts such as states of matter, chemical reactions, refraction and reflection of light, wave theory, and systems of measurement. Students learn about scientific research and conduct a culminating research project on careers in physical science. Students complete hands on labs throughout the course.
  • Biology
    Students enrolled in Biology study the physical structures and functions of plants, animals, and humans. They explore cell structure, the processes of mitosis and meiosis, plant anatomy, human anatomy, genetics, and the theory of evolution. In addition to conducting experiments using microscopes, students dissect a virtual pig and look closely at internal human anatomy through the use of interactive software. Students present a final paper or project upon completion of the course.
  • Chemistry
    Chemistry offers students the opportunity to deepen their understanding of the physical world and to apply their mathematical skills to solving chemical equations. Students are introduced to atomic structure and weights, the periodic table, chemical bonding, the mole concept, gases, solids, liquids, solutions, chemical equilibrium, acids, and bases. They learn to calculate molecular and formulaic weights and to balance chemical equations. The course concludes with a final presentation of a research paper or project.

  • Physics
    In this Physics course, students examine force and its effects, light and sound, electricity and magnetism, energy resources, the solar system, and gravity. Students conduct hands-on experiments and complete virtual labs to enhance their understanding of gravity, acceleration, optics, and circuits.

  • Environmental Science
  • Environmental Science explores the biological, physical, and sociological principles related to the environment in which organisms live on Earth, the biosphere. Course topics include natural systems on Earth, biogeochemical cycles, the nature of matter and energy, the flow of matter and energy through living systems, populations, communities, ecosystems, ecological pyramids, renewable and non-renewable natural resources, land use, biodiversity, pollution, conservation, sustainability, and human impacts on the environment.

1Course is 0.5 credit

Social Studies

The following courses are offered for up to 1.0 credit unless otherwise specified.

  • Geography and World Cultures Ancient
    In this course, students learn the five themes of geography and practice using the tools of geographers. They explore ancient civilizations around the world and learn about the characteristics and cultural contributions of each. Students will create an ancient Mayan travel guide, write an imaginative journal of a trader traveling through early African empires, document a day in the life of a woman in ancient Rome, generate a message in cuneiform, and moreF.

  • Geography and World Cultures Regions & Peoples
    This course covers topics in world history from the middle ages to the mid-nineteenth century. Units of study include Castles & Knights, Renaissance Art, The Age of Reason and Enlightenment, Exploration, Transportation & Cities, and more. Students will create a map of Spanish missions in America, create a historical Facebook page for an Enlightenment thinker, design a storyboard on the plague, and build a medieval castle.

  • World Governments and Economics
    This course focuses on the purposes and forms of government around the world. They also learn about basic principles of economics and apply them to their understanding of global political systems. Students conduct research and present their findings. They create visualizations of information, write about historical events from the perspective of a journalist, and even develop a budget.

  • U.S. Government and Constitution
    In this course, students explore ideas that influenced the development of American government and identify principles foundational to our government past and present. Student also learn the three branches of government, citizenship rights and responsibilities, and civil rights and liberties. Students analyze primary documents, create infographics, review Supreme Court decisions, and discuss citizenship.

  • US. History to the Civil War
    In this course, students explore the sweep of history from the earliest migration of peoples across the Bering Strait to a young nation in crisis at the onset of the Civil War. Students research the true story of Pocahontas, create a museum exhibit on the slave trade, review the impact of the steam engine on the changing American landscape, create a biographical sketch of an early immigrant, draw a map depicting Westward expansion, and more.

  • U.S. History from the Civil War
    This course covers historical topics from Reconstruction to the Contemporary Tech Boom. Students learn about the Robber Barons, Queen Liliokalani of Hawaii, changing roles for women in American society and the causes and impacts of wars on the nation; from WWI through the war on terrorism. Students create infographics, conduct short research projects, and design illustrations of New Deal programs, all while honing their skills of critical thinking, evaluation, and personal response to history.
  • U.S. History
    It is important to understand the past in order to make sound decisions for the future. In U.S. History, students are challenged to look at key events in our nation’s history and how they affect us today. Students use textbooks, library resources, and the Internet, and conclude their study with a presentation of a historical timeline and two research papers or projects.
  • World History
    World History offers students the opportunity to explore ancient cultures, Europe, Asia, South America, the Middle East, and Africa. Students use a variety of resources to understand the complexity of the world in which we live. Students also study geography and its impact on human history. They complete research papers on topics of their choice throughout the course.

  • U.S. Government and Politics1
    This is an introductory course designed to familiarize students with the foundations of the U.S. government, the fundamentals of citizenship, and the United States’ relations with, and responsibilities to, the rest of the world. Students complete a Constitution project, a research paper on a government career, and one appropriate essay topic of the student’s choice.

  • Geography and World Cultures1
    Geography and World Cultures enables students to explore how geographic features, human relationships, political and social structures, economics, science and technology, and the arts have developed and influenced life in countries around the world. In this course, students are given rigorous instruction on how to read and create maps, charts, and graphs. The course develops note-taking skills, teaches the basic elements of analytic writing, and introduces students to the close examination of primary documents.
  • Multicultural Studies1
    Multicultural Studies is a course that examines the United States as a multicultural nation. It emphasizes the perspectives of minority groups while allowing students from all backgrounds to better understand and appreciate how race, culture, ethnicity, and identity contribute to their experiences. Major topics in the course include identity, immigration, assimilation and distinctiveness, power and oppression, struggles for rights, regionalism, culture and the media, and the formation of new cultures.
  • Psychology1
    Psychology provides an overview of the field’s major domains: methods, biopsychology, cognitive and developmental psychology, and variations in individual and group behavior. By focusing on significant scientific research and on the questions that are most important to psychologists, students see psychology as an evolving science. Each topic clusters around challenge questions, such as “What is happiness?” Students answer these questions before, during, and after they interact with direct instruction.

  • Sociology1
    Sociology examines why people think and behave as they do in relationships, groups, institutions, and societies. Major course topics include individual and group identity, social structures and institutions, social change, social stratification, social dynamics in recent and current events, the effects of social change on individuals, and the research methods used by social scientists.

  • U.S. and Global Economics1
    U.S. and Global Economics provides an introduction to key economic principles and covers fundamental properties of economics. Topics include an examination of markets from both historical and current perspectives; the basics of supply and demand; the theories of early economic philosophers; theories of value; the concept of money and how it evolved; the role of banks, investment houses, and the Federal Reserve; Keynesian economics; the productivity, wages, investment, and growth involved in capitalism; unemployment; inflations; and the national debt. The course also includes a survey of markets in areas such as China, Europe, and the Middle East.

1Course is 0.5 credit

World Languages

  • French I
    French I teaches students to greet people, describe family and friends, talk about hobbies, and communicate about other topics, such as sports, travel, and medicine. Each lesson presents vocabulary, grammar, and culture in context, followed by explanations and exercises. Vocabulary includes terms to describe school subjects, parts of the body, and people, as well as idiomatic phrases. Instruction in language structure and grammar includes the verb system, adjective agreement, formal and informal address, reflexive verbs, and past tense. Students also gain an understanding of the cultures of French-speaking countries and regions within and outside Europe, as well as insight into Francophone culture and people.
  • French II
    French II teaches students to communicate more confidently about themselves, as well as about topics beyond their own lives - both in formal and informal address. Each lesson presents vocabulary, grammar, and culture in context, followed by explanations and exercises. Vocabulary includes terms in cooking, geography, and architecture. Instruction in language structure and grammar includes present- and past-tense verb forms and uses, negation, and direct and indirect objects. Students deepen their knowledge of French-speaking regions and cultures by learning about history, literature, culture, and contemporary issues.

  • Spanish I
    Spanish I teaches students to greet people, describe family and friends, talk about hobbies, and communicate about other topics, such as home life, occupations, travel, and medicine. Each lesson presents vocabulary, grammar, and culture in context, followed by explanations and exercises. Vocabulary includes terms to describe school subjects, parts of the body, and people, as well as idiomatic phrases. Instruction in language structure and grammar includes the structures and uses of present-tense verb forms, imperatives, adjective agreement, impersonal constructions, formal and informal address, and reflexive verbs. Students explore words used in different Spanish-speaking regions and learn about the cultures of Spanish-speaking countries and regions within and outside Europe.

  • Spanish II
    Building on Spanish I concepts, Spanish II students learn to communicate more confidently about themselves, as well as about topics beyond their own lives - both in formal and informal situations. Each lesson presents vocabulary, grammar, and culture in context, followed by explanations and exercises. Students expand their vocabulary in topics such as cooking, ecology, geography, and architecture. Instruction in language structure and grammar includes a review of present-tense verb forms, an introduction to the past tense, the conditional mood, imperatives, impersonal constructions, and reported speech. Students deepen their knowledge of Spanish-speaking regions and cultures by learning about history, literature, culture, and contemporary issues.

  • Spanish III
    In Spanish III, students build upon the skills and knowledge they acquired in Spanish I and II. The course presents new vocabulary and grammatical concepts in context while providing students with ample opportunities to review and expand upon the material they have learned previously.

    Students read and listen to authentic materials from newspapers, magazines, and television. The content is focused on contemporary and relevant topics such as urbanization and population growth in Latin American countries, global health concerns, jobs of the future, and scientific advancements. The materials engage students as they improve their command of Spanish.

    Students review the formation and use of regular and irregular verbs in the present and future tenses, as well as the use of reflexive particles and infinitives. They also expand their understanding of noun and adjective agreement, the comparative and superlative degree of adjectives, and the placement and use of direct and indirect objects and pronouns. Students expand their vocabulary through exposure to word roots and families, popular slang, the correct use of words that are often confused for one another, and review of concepts such as proper placement of accents and stress.

    Presentation of new materials is always followed by several interactive, online exercises, allowing students to master the material as they learn it. Teacher-scored activities provide students with opportunities to use their new Spanish skills both orally and in writing. Discussion activities allow students to interact with their peers in the target language.

Fine Arts

The following courses are offered for up to 1.0 credit unless otherwise specified.

  • Art Appreciation1
    Art Appreciation is a survey of the history of Western visual arts, with a primary focus on painting. Students begin with an introduction to the basic principles of painting and learn how to critique and compare works of art. While Western art is the course’s primary focus, students also study artistic traditions from Africa, Asia, Oceania, and the Americas. Coverage of each artistic movement highlights historical context and introduces students to key artists who represent a variety of geographical locations. Throughout the course, students apply what they have learned about critiquing to analyze and evaluate both individual artists and individual works of art.
  • Music Appreciation
    Music Appreciation introduces students to the history, theory, and genres of music, from the most primitive surviving examples, through classical, to the most contemporary music in the world at large. The course covers primitive musical forms, classical music, and American jazz, and also presents rich modern traditions, including gospel, folk, soul, blues, Latin rhythms, rock and roll, and hip-hop. Students explore the interface of music and social movements and examine how the emergent global society and the Internet are bringing musical forms together in new ways.

1Course is 0.5 credit

Life Skills

  • College and Career Preparation I1
    In College and Career Preparation I, students obtain a deeper understanding of what it means to be ready for college, including the college application process, what it takes to be a successful college student, and how to begin thinking about their careers. Students learn about the importance of high school performance in college admissions, how to prepare for college testing, and the types of schools and degrees they may choose to pursue after high school. They also gain exposure to the financial resources available that can make college attainable. Students come away from this course understanding how smart preparation and skill development in high school can lead to expansive career opportunities after they have completed their education and are ready for the working world.
  • College and Career Preparation II1
    College and Career Preparation II builds on the lessons and skills in College and Career Preparation I and provides a step-by-step guide to choosing a college. It walks students through the process of filling out an application (with opportunities to practice) and takes an in-depth look at the various college admission tests and assessments, as well financial aid options. The course also instructs students in interviewing techniques and provides career guidance. Students explore valuable career-preparation opportunities such as job shadowing and internships. (College and Career Preparation I is not a prerequisite.)

1Course is 0.5 credit

Health/PE

The following courses are offered for up to 1.0 credit unless otherwise specified.

  • Health1
    Health consists of units on nutrition, exercise, addiction, disease, the human body, reproduction, decision-making, and conflict resolution. Students explore concepts through assigned fiction and nonfiction readings, research, and discussion. The American Red Cross provides CPR instruction and certification.
  • Physical Education1
  • Physical Education combines the best of online instruction with actual student participation in weekly cardiovascular, aerobic, and muscle toning activities. The course promotes a keen understanding of the value of physical fitness and aims to motivate students to participate in physical activities throughout their lives.
    Specific areas of study include: Cardiovascular exercise and care, safe exercising, building muscle strength and endurance, injury prevention, fitness skills and FITT benchmarks, goal setting, nutrition and diet (vitamins and minerals, food labels, evaluation product claims), and stress management. The course requires routine participation in adult-supervised physical activities. Successful completion of this course will require parent/legal guardian sign-off on student-selected physical activities and on weekly participation reports to verify the student is meeting his or her requirements and responsibilities.
    Physical Education is aligned to national and state standards and the Presidential Council on Physical Fitness and Sports.

1Course is 0.5 credit

Foundations

The following courses are offered for up to 1.0 credit unless otherwise specified.

  • English Foundations
    English Foundations supports adolescent literacy development in reading and writing. Through intensive reading and writing skills instruction, deep practice sets, consistent formative feedback, graduated reading levels, and helpful strategy tips, the course leads the student to improved comprehension. The student learns how to use academic tools, and build vocabulary and effective study skills. This course helps the student build composition fundamentals by focusing on the areas of composing, grammar, style, and media literacy. At the end of the course, the student will have developed skills for continued success in the academic world.

  • Math Foundations
    The Math Foundations course covers foundational concepts and skills — including basic vocabulary — to build or strengthen a base on which to develop understanding of more difficult mathematical concepts in future courses. Topics include basic number concepts such as whole numbers, counting, and place value; advanced number concepts such as rounding, exponents, and negative numbers; addition and subtraction; multiplication and division; fractions and operations with fractions; decimals, percents, and ratios; estimation; problem solving; basic concepts in geometry; and measuring shapes. This course includes audio resources in both English and Spanish to assist students with language, reading, or other learning difficulties.

  • Reading Skills and Strategies
    Reading Skills and Strategies is designed for special education students and for students unable to enroll in an appropriate grade-level course. Students enrolling in this course demonstrate significant deficits on entrance assessments. The focus of this remedial class is to build basic skills. Upon completion of the course, the student should show at least one year’s growth on an exit assessment; however, the student may still demonstrate skills significantly below grade level.
  • Science Foundations
    Science Foundations provides students with opportunities to develop the knowledge, skills, and strategies necessary for success in rigorous high school science courses. The course is appropriate for use as remediation at the high school level or as a bridge to high school.
  • Writing Skills and Strategies
    The Writing Skills and Strategies course is designed for special education students and for students unable to enroll in an appropriate grade-level course. Students enrolled in this class have demonstrated significant deficits on entrance assessments; the focus of this remedial class is to build basic skills. Upon completion of the course, the student should show at least one year’s growth on an exit assessment; however, the student may still demonstrate skills significantly below grade level.

1Course is 0.5 credit

NCAA

  • Choose from 50+ NCAA-approved courses
  • Visit the NCAA high school portal website and enter "Brightmont Academy" as the school to view a full list of approved courses

Honors

Most of the standard college-prep courses listed are available as honors courses. Consult with the Campus Director for details.

Advanced Placement

Authorized by the College Board, these Advanced Placement (AP)* courses meet the higher-education expectations of college-level courses and prepare students to demonstrate achievement through success on the AP exams.

English

  • AP English Language and Composition
    In AP* English Language and Composition, students learn to understand and analyze complex styles of writing by reading works from a variety of authors. They’ll explore the richness of language, including syntax, imitation, word choice, and tone. They’ll also learn about their own composition style and process, starting with exploration, planning, and writing, and continuing through editing, peer review, rewriting, polishing, and applying what they learn to a breadth of academic, personal, and professional contexts. The equivalent of an introductory-level college class, this course prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in communications, creative writing, journalism, literature, and composition.
  • AP English Literature and Composition
    AP* English Literature and Composition immerses students in novels, plays, poems, and short stories from various periods. Students will read and write daily, using a variety of multimedia and interactive activities, interpretive writing assignments, and class discussions to assess and improve their skills and knowledge. The course places special emphasis on reading comprehension, structural and critical analysis of written works, literary vocabulary, and recognizing and understanding literary devices. The equivalent of an introductory-college level class, this course prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in creative writing, communications, journalism, literature, and composition.

Math

  • AP Calculus AB
    In AP* Calculus AB, students learn to understand change geometrically and visually (by studying graphs of curves), analytically (by studying and working with mathematical formulas), numerically (by seeing patterns in sets of numbers), and verbally. Instead of simply getting the right answer, students learn to evaluate the soundness of proposed solutions and to apply mathematical reasoning to real-world models. Calculus helps scientists, engineers, and financial analysts understand the complex relationships behind real-world phenomena. The equivalent of an introductory-level college calculus course, AP Calculus AB prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in science, engineering, and mathematics.
  • AP Statistics
    AP* Statistics gives students hands-on experience collecting, analyzing, graphing, and interpreting real-world data. They will learn to effectively design and analyze research studies by reviewing and evaluating real research. The next time they hear the results from another poll or study, they will know whether the results are valid. As the art of drawing conclusions from imperfect data and the science of real-world uncertainties, statistics plays an important role in many fields. The equivalent of an introductory-level college course, AP Statistics prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in science, sociology, medicine, engineering, political science, geography, and business.

Science

  • AP Biology
    AP* Biology builds students’ understanding of biology on both the micro and macro scales. After studying cell biology, students move on to understand how evolution drives the diversity and unity of life. Students will examine how living systems store, retrieve, transmit, and respond to information and the processes used by organisms to utilize free energy. The equivalent of an introductory-level college biology course, AP Biology prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in science, health sciences, and engineering.
  • AP Chemistry
    AP* Chemistry builds students’ understanding of the nature and reactivity of matter. After studying the structure of atoms, molecules, and ions, students move on to solve quantitative chemical problems and explore how molecular structure relates to chemical and physical properties. Students will examine the molecular composition of common substances and learn to predictably transform them through chemical reactions. The equivalent of an introductory-level college chemistry course, AP Chemistry prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in science, health sciences, and engineering.
  • AP Environmental Science
  • AP* Environmental Science provides students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world. The course draws upon various disciplines, including geology, biology, environmental studies, environmental science, chemistry, and geography in order to explore a variety of environmental topics. Topics explored include natural systems on Earth; biogeochemical cycles; the nature of matter and energy; the flow of matter and energy through living systems; populations; communities; ecosystems; ecological pyramids; renewable and nonrenewable resources; land use; biodiversity; pollution; conservation; sustainability; and human impacts on the environment. The equivalent of an introductory college-level science course, AP Environmental Science prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in science, health sciences, or engineering.
  • AP Psychology1
    AP* Psychology provides an overview of current psychological research methods and theories. Students will explore the therapies used by professional counselors and clinical psychologists and examine the reasons for normal human reactions: how people learn and think, the process of human development and human aggression, altruism, intimacy, and self-reflection. They’ll study core psychological concepts, such as the brain and sense functions, and learn to gauge human reactions, gather information, and form meaningful syntheses. Along the way, students will also investigate relevant concepts like study skills and information retention. The equivalent of an introductory-level college course, AP Psychology prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in psychology and life sciences.

Social Studies

  • AP Macroeconomics1
    In AP* Macroeconomics, students learn why and how the world economy can change from month to month, how to identify trends in our economy, and how to use those trends to develop performance measures and predictors of economic growth or decline. They’ll also examine how individuals, institutions, and influences affect people, and how those factors can impact everyone’s life through employment rates, government spending, inflation, taxes, and production. The equivalent of an introductory-level college class, this course prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in business, political science and history.
  • AP Microeconomics1
    AP* Microeconomics studies the behavior of individuals and businesses as they exchange goods and services in the marketplace. Students will learn why the same product costs different amounts at different stores, in different cities, at different times. They’ll also learn to spot patterns in economic behavior and how to use those patterns to explain buyer and seller behavior under various conditions. Microeconomics studies the economic way of thinking, understanding the nature and function of markets, the role of scarcity and competition, the influence of factors such as interest rates on business decisions, and the role of government in promoting a healthy economy. The equivalent an introductory-level college course, AP Microeconomics prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in business, history, and political science.
  • AP U.S. Government and Politics1
    AP* U.S. Government and Politics studies the operations and structure of the U.S. government and the behavior of the electorate and politicians. Students will gain the analytic perspective necessary to critically evaluate political data, hypotheses, concepts, opinions, and processes. Along the way, they’ll learn how to gather data about political behavior and develop their own theoretical analysis of American politics. They’ll also build the skills they need to examine general propositions about government and politics, and to analyze the specific relationships between political, social, and economic institutions. The equivalent of an introductory-level college course, AP U.S. Government and Politics prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in political science, law, education, business, and history.
  • AP U.S. History
    AP* U.S. History analyzes and explores the economic, political, and social changes in America since Columbus. Students master historical knowledge and critical analysis, build reading, writing, and communication skills, and discover how historical events have contributed to American culture. In the process, they’ll learn how decisions and events of the past continue to have profound effects on the world today and how knowledge of the causes behind past events can influence future decisions. By the end of the course, students will be ready to put their factual knowledge to work by weighing evidence and interpreting problems presented by historians. The equivalent of an introductory-level college course, AP U.S. History prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in history, political science, economics, sociology, and law.

World Languages

  • AP Spanish Language
    In AP* Spanish Language students perfect their Spanish speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing skills. They study the vocabulary, grammar, and cultural aspects of the language, and then apply what they’ve learned in extensive written and spoken exercises. By the end of the course, students will have an expansive vocabulary and a solid, working knowledge of all verb forms and tenses. The equivalent of a college-level language course, AP Spanish Language prepares students for the AP exam and for further study of Spanish language, culture, or literature.

1Course is 0.5 credit
*Advanced Placement and AP are registered trademarks of the College Board. This course has been authorized by the College Board to use the AP designation.

Sophia College Courses

Dual College and High School Credit courses

  • Accounting
    Sophia's Accounting course helps students gain mastery of the fundamental principles and procedures of the modern practice of accounting. Students will gain practical experience with bookkeeping and preparing financial reports within the context of operating a sole proprietorship. Students will use a problem-solving approach to actively apply key concepts of introductory accounting to realistic case studies. At the end of the course, students will have achieved the following learning outcomes: identify accounting fundamentals; analyze financial reporting; apply principles of accounting for merchandising operations; and analyze advanced accounting topics.
  • Ancient Greek Philosophers
    The ancient Greek philosophers were among the first to ask fundamental questions about human existence, and this course provides an overview of key figures such as Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle and examines their role in shaping history and society. The course will also apply philosophical lenses to analyze some of life’s “big questions “ with new depth and perspective. At the end of the course, the student will have achieved the following learning outcomes: recognize the value of the study of philosophy and its application to everyday life, identify the nature and significance of the major branches of philosophical inquiry, understand the general philosophical positions and arguments of key ancient Greek philosophers, understand the impact that ancient philosophical theories have had on history and society, apply good philosophical logic, reasoning, and critical thinking skills, compare and contrast various philosophical approaches to essential philosophical questions, and apply philosophical approaches to real world situations.
  • Art History
    Sophia's Introduction to Art History course helps you master fundamentals of art history from prehistoric times to the Renaissance. In this course, you will explore art exhibits, analyze buildings and architecture, and examine art in everyday life. At the end of the course, the student will have achieved the following learning outcomes: describe the basics of Art History, recognize movements that have been significant in Art History, identify methods used to evaluate artwork, characterize the art and architecture from prehistoric times through early renaissance, analyze various works of art according to specific criteria, understand the cultural significance of various works of art, and recognize characteristics or ways to identify art from different regions of the world.
  • English Composition 1
    Sophia's English Composition I course takes you through the stages of the writing process, from brainstorming and drafting through revision and proofreading. Students will strengthen their writing skills and become more engaged readers and stronger critical thinkers. At the end of the course, the student will have achieved the following learning outcomes: describe english composition; articulate the writing process; apply writing and revising techniques; conduct research and integrate evidence; and synthesize academic writing skills.
  • College Algebra
    Sophia's College Algebra Course helps students build mastery around linear, non­-linear, and other mathematical functions that include algebraic, graphic, and numeric properties. At the end of the course, students will have achieved the following learning outcomes: perform mathematical functions involving real numbers; apply mathematical concepts to linear equations, inequalities, and series/sequences, apply mathematical concepts to linear representations and systems of linear equations and inequalities; apply mathematical concepts to algebraic expressions and quadratic equations; apply mathematical concepts to functions and non­linear equations.

  • Introduction to Statistics
    Sophia's Introduction to Statistics Course helps students gain mastery of the basic principles of statistics. In this course students will learn a variety of topics, including statistical principles, research methodologies, data analysis, and hypothesis testing. Students will also have the opportunity to demonstrate the application of these topics in statistics to everyday situations. At the end of the course, students will have achieved the following learning outcomes: understand and identify key principles of statistical reasoning and statistical methods; apply concepts of data and data representation in a real world context; calculate variation and central tendency and recognize patterns in distributions; apply concepts of probability and risk in real life scenarios; determine correlation and causation and distinguish between them in context; and apply concepts of hypothesis testing and utilize t-tests, z-tests, and ANOVA in real world situations.

  • Environmental Science
    Sophia's Environmental Science course teaches students about human impacts on the natural world. Students will apply knowledge of a wide range of environmental issues in context, exploring topics such as natural resources, endangered species, pollution, and climate change. At the end of the course, students will have achieved the following learning outcomes: describe environmental science; apply principles of earth science, ecology, and conservation; articulate impacts of development, agriculture, and waste; analyze environmental issues, policies, and solutions.

  • Human Biology
    Sophia’s Human Biology course helps students analyze fundamental biological principles from a human perspective. The human biology topics include the molecular and cellular basis of life, genetics, organ systems, and the impact of nutrition and exercise on human health. At the end of the course, students will have achieved the following learning outcomes: describe basic human biology concepts; describe skeletal & muscular systems; articulate nervous system and sensory system related to human health; analyze respiratory, circulatory, immune, and digestive systems; describe urinary, endocrine, and reproductive systems; and describe genetics and biotechnology and their application.

  • Introduction to Psychology
    Sophia's Introduction to Psychology Course helps students understand the basic principles of psychology and the scientific methods. Students will study a variety of topics, including the brain, learning and memory, personality, social influence, child and lifespan development, and psychopathology. Students will also have the ability to demonstrate the application of these psychology topics to everyday situations. At the end of the course, students will have achieved the following learning outcomes: identify foundational philosophies, therapies, and specializations in the field of psychology; analyze developmental psychology across the lifespan; identify theories of personality and personality assessment, articulate scientific research methodology and analytical approaches in the field of psychology; articulate how brain and psychological factors impact mental health and behavior; and classify psychological disorders and impact on well­-being.

  • Introduction to Sociology
    Sophia's Introduction to Sociology Course helps students gain mastery of the basic principles of sociology. Students will learn a variety of topics, including sociological theory, cultural deviance, social interaction, diversity, stratification, education, technology, and health in modern society. Students will also have the opportunity to demonstrate the application of these topics in sociology to everyday situations. At the end of the course, students will have achieved the following learning outcomes: identify foundational philosophies, theories, and methods in the field of sociology; apply principles of culture and deviance to real life scenarios; analyze social interaction and collective behavior in a real-world context; identify and apply elements of diversity, stratification, and inequality in real life; and analyze perspectives on elements of modern society.

  • Microeconomics
    Sophia's Microeconomics course helps students explore and interpret the behavior of individual consumers and firms in the marketplace. Through this exploration, students will learn how to evaluate decisions, both public and private, with an eye towards production, consumption and transfer of wealth. Students will also learn how to apply conceptual principles of microeconomics in practical ways to everyday life. At the end of the course, students will have achieved the following learning outcomes: describe economics; examine the consumer; analyze the firm; and interpret market interactions: consumer and firm.

  • Macroeconomics
    Sophia's Macroeconomics course helps students thoroughly understand the principles of economics related to the economic behaviors on a national and international scale. Students learn the role of fiscal and monetary policy, how broad market systems and the business cycle work, as well as analyze the reasons for and against government interventions in the economy. At the end of the course, students will have achieved the following learning outcomes: describe macroeconomics; examine the principles of market efficiency; analyze monetary, money, and financial systems; and interpret international trade, aggregate demand and supply, and prices and growth.

  • Project Management
    Sophia's Project Management course takes students through the life cycle of managing a project, from designing the scope to releasing the project team and celebrating your success. Along the way students will gain applied experience with project planning as well as managing project resources and risks. At the end of the course, students will have achieved the following learning outcomes: analyze the beginning of the project, illustrate the project planning process, apply project management skills, and evaluate project completion.

  • Introduction to Business
    Sophia's Introduction to Business Course helps students understand the business world. Students will examine the environment of business, the art and science of marketing, what successful management of human resources looks like, and the basics of business finance and business investment. Students will also learn how these concepts apply to companies of all sizes whether big, small or even entrepreneurial. At the end of the course, students will have achieved the following learning outcomes: describe the environment of business; examine the art and science of marketing; analyze the successful management of human resources; and evaluate finance and investment in business.

  • Foundations of College Algebra
    Sophia's Foundations of College Algebra course builds foundational algebraic and problem solving skills needed to succeed in a college-level algebra course. You will build your understanding of linear and quadratic relationships, and apply these concepts to real world situations through Sophia's scenario-based activities. At the end of the course, students will have achieved the following learning outcomes: simplify and evaluate numerical expressions, solve linear equations and inequalities, interpret slope, intercepts, and graphs of lines, simplify and multiply exponents and polynomials factor polynomial expressions, solve quadratic equations, and perform operations on complex numbers

  • Foundations of English Composition

    Sophia's Foundations of English Composition course teaches foundational writing skills that will enable students to be successful in a college level English Composition course. Students will learn how to construct sound sentences, craft effective paragraphs, and write cohesive compositions, developing their writing skills through all stages of the writing process. At the end of the course, students will have achieved the following learning outcomes: write effective sentences and paragraphs and write effective essays.

  • Visual Communications
    Sophia's Visual Communications Course helps students to gain mastery of the essentials of communicating visually and apply this mastery in context. Students will explore visual theories and learn about the key elements and principles of visual design, with a focus on color, typography, layout, and design analysis. This course emphasizes real world context and the role that visual communications play in today's society. At the end of the course, students will have achieved the following learning outcomes: examine basic visual design concepts; distinguish how color, type, & layout contribute to communication; analyze the role of design in visual communications; and evaluate visual communication processes and products.

  • Introduction to Art History
    Sophia's Introduction to Art History Course helps students gain mastery of the basic art history elements of the Western world from prehistoric to modern times. In this course, students will explore art exhibits, analyze buildings and architecture, and examine art in everyday life. At the end of the course, students will have achieved the following learning outcomes: describe art history; examine art from 22,000 BC through 400 AD; distinguish art from 401 AD through 1450 AD; analyze art from 1451 AD through 1800 AD; categorize art from 1801 AD through 1900 AD; and interpret art from 1901 AD through present.
  • Approaches to Studying Religions
    Sophia's Approaches to Studying Religion course helps students gain mastery of the basic concepts integral to the study of religion and understand how these concepts apply in real world situations. Students will explore key components of religions as they apply to a range of different belief systems and will explore the role of religion in modern society. At the end of the course, students will have achieved the following learning outcomes: investigate the major approaches to studying religion; identify common elements of religions; analyze religion's impact on individuals, society, and the world; and evaluate social, ethical, and cultural topics through the lens of religion.

  • Conflict Resolution
    Sophia's Conflict Resolution Course helps students gain mastery of the basic concepts of conflict resolution and how to apply these concepts in real world situations and our own lives. Students will explore key theories and skills associated with conflict resolution in a variety of contexts, including organizational, intercultural, family and interpersonal. At the end of the course, students will have achieved the following learning outcomes: describe conflict resolution and theories of conflict; examine the fundamentals of conflict order; develop conflict resolution skills; interpret the role of culture and gender in conflict resolution; analyze group conflict; and apply the strategies of conflict resolution.
  • Introduction to Ethics
    Sophia's Introduction to Ethics course uses problem-based learning to help students apply knowledge to real-life situations. By using relatable scenarios, students will learn how to think critically about ethical and philosophical inquiry, explore their belief system, and better understand the role of ethics in everyday life. At the end of the course, students will know how to explain the goal of ethics, evaluate philosophical arguments, and understand key terminology. Students will be able to apply moral theories to real-world issues and interpret the role of bias in ethical decision-making.
  • Introduction to Information Technology
    Sophia's Introduction to Information Technology course gives you a general overview of information systems, security issues, and how businesses use technology and information systems. Topics include: computer basics, application software, understanding networks and the internet, and software development and IT careers. At the end of the course, students will be able to define different types of hardware, software, operating systems and networks, apply HTML tags, and learn about IT tools used to maintain and evolve information systems.
  • Public Speaking
    Sophia's Public Speaking course provides the tools to prepare, develop and present clear, engaging speeches.
    At the end of the course, students will have mastered skills that will help them write and give a compelling topical speech, thoughtfully incorporate feedback, improve their listening skills, and minimize anxiety around public speaking.
  • U.S. History I
    This course encompasses key events and era in US History from prehistory and early settlers to the Civil War and Reconstruction. Themes, eras, and events include: the first settlers, growth of the colonies, the American War for Independence, and The Civil War and Reconstruction. At the end of the course, students will know how to analyze primary and secondary sources to form and defend their conclusions. They'll be able to think more like a historian by using different contextual lenses to understand events and eras through a variety of perspectives.
  • U.S. History II
    US History II begins in the late 1800s (after Reconstruction) and continues through 2015. Themes, events, and eras include: westward expansion, The Great Depression, World War II, and 9/11 and its aftermath. Designed to build critical thinking skills, this course teaches students to analyze primary sources, form conclusions, and apply different historical lenses to events to help them interpret history through a variety of perspectives.








Career and Technical Education

  • Computer Applications1
  • Computer Applications provides an introduction to software applications that prepares students to succeed in the workplace and beyond. Students will develop an understanding of professional communications and leadership skills while gaining proficiency with word processing, email, and presentation management software. Students will also be able to demonstrate digital literacy through basic study web publishing and design, spreadsheets and database software. This course allows students to explore careers in the fields of business and information technology while learning skills applicable to any professional setting. Through a series of hands-on activities, students will create, analyze, and critique reports, letters, project plans, presentations, and other professional communications. Regular engagement in active learning ensures students can continually refine the skills necessary to prepare them for work. In addition, students will evaluate the qualifications required for specific careers so they can identify opportunities that are of interest to them. Computer Applications is an introductory level Career and Technical Education course applicable to programs of study in Business Management and Administration, Information Technology, and other career clusters. This course is built to state and national standards.
  • Business Applications1
  • Business Applications prepares students to succeed in the workplace. Students begin by establishing an awareness of the roles essential to an organization's success, and then work to develop an understanding of professional communications and leadership skills. In doing so, students gain proficiency with word processing, email, and presentation management software. This course allows students to explore careers in business while learning skills applicable to any professional setting. Through a series of hands-on activities, students will create, analyze, and critique reports, letters, project plans, presentations, and other professional communications. Regular engagement in active learning ensures students can continually refine the skills necessary to prepare them for work. In addition, students will evaluate the qualifications required for specific careers so they can identify opportunities that are of interest to them. Business Applications is an introductory level Career and Technical Education course applicable to programs of study in business, management, and administration; information technology; and other career clusters. This course is aligned with state and national standards. Students who successfully complete the course can go on to obtain the Microsoft® Office Specialist: Microsoft® Office Word certification.*
  • Introduction to Business and Marketing1
  • Introduction to Business and Marketing provides the foundational knowledge and skills students need for careers in business and marketing. Students begin exploring roles and functions that business and marketing play in a global society, develop an understanding of the market place, as well as understanding product placement and promotion. Using hands-on activities, students reinforce, apply and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant real-world inspired scenarios. This course focuses on developing knowledge and skills around marketing, pricing, and distribution, while also focusing on economics and interpersonal skills. This course also addresses exploring career options in marketing as well as securing and keeping a job. Introduction to Business and Marketing is as an introductory-level Career and Technical course for programs of study in Business Administration and Management. This course is aligned with state and national standards.
  • Intermediate Business and Marketing1
  • Intermediate Business and Marketing provides the intermediate knowledge and skills students need for careers in business and marketing. Students analyze the impact of government, legal systems, and organized labor on business; develop an understanding of business communications and management; and explore legal, ethical, and financial issues in business and marketing. Furthermore, students delve into basic economic concepts including personal finance, economic systems, cost-profit relationships, and economic indicators and trends. Using hands-on activities, students reinforce, apply, and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant real-world inspired scenarios. This course focuses on developing knowledge and skills around marketing and management, while also focusing on economics and financial literacy. This course also allows students to explore career options in business and marketing. Intermediate Business and Marketing is as an intermediate-level Career and Technical course for programs of study in Business Administration and Management. This course is aligned with state and national standards.
  • Principles of Business, Marketing and Finance
    Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance provides the knowledge and skills students need for careers in business and marketing. Students begin exploring roles and functions that business and marketing play in a global society, develop an understanding of the market place, as well as understanding product placement and promotion. Students analyze the impact of government, legal systems, and organized labor on business; develop an understanding of business communications and management; and explore legal, ethical, and financial issues in business and marketing. Furthermore, students delve into basic economic concepts including personal finance, economic systems, cost-profit relationships, and economic indicators and trends. Using hands-on activities, students reinforce, apply and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant real-world inspired scenarios. This course focuses on developing knowledge and skills around marketing, pricing, distribution and management, while also focusing on economics and interpersonal skills. This course also addresses exploring career options in business and marketing as well as securing and keeping a job. This course is aligned with state and national standards.
  • Information Technology Applications1
  • Information Technology Applications prepares students to work in the field of Information Technology. Students will be able to demonstrate digital literacy through basic study of computer hardware, operating systems, networking, the Internet, web publishing, spreadsheets and database software. Through a series of hand-on activities, students will learn what to expect in the field of Information Technology and begin exploring career options in the field. Information Technology Applications is an introductory level Career and Technical Education course applicable to programs of study in information technology as well as other career clusters. This course is aligned with state and national standards. Students who successfully complete the course will be prepared to pursue the Microsoft® Office Specialist certifications in Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Access, as well as IC3 certification.
  • Principles of Information Technology
  • Principles of Information Technology prepares students to succeed in the workplace. Students begin by establishing an awareness of the roles essential to an organization's success, and then work to develop an understanding of professional communications and leadership skills. In doing so, students gain proficiency with word processing, email, and presentation management software. Students will also be able to demonstrate digital literacy through basic study of computer hardware, operating systems, networking, the Internet, web publishing, spreadsheets and database software. This course allows students to explore careers in information technology and business while learning skills applicable to any professional setting. Through a series of hands-on activities, students will create, analyze, and critique reports, letters, project plans, presentations, and other professional communications. Students will learn what to expect in the field of Information Technology and begin exploring career options in the field. Regular engagement in active learning ensures students can continually refine the skills necessary to prepare them for work. In addition, students will evaluate the qualifications required for specific careers so they can identify opportunities that are of interest to them. Principles of Information Technology is a full-year introductory Career and Technical Education course applicable to programs of study in business, management, and administration; information technology; and other career clusters. This course is aligned with state and national standards. Students who successfully complete the course will be prepared to pursue the Microsoft® Office Specialist certifications in Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Access*, as well as IC3 certification.
  • Introduction to Health Science1
  • Introduction to Health Science provides the foundational knowledge and skills students need for careers in health care. Students begin by exploring the services, structure, and professions of the health care system. The remainder of the course focuses on day-to-day skills and expectations for health professionals, which include promoting wellness, maintaining a safe environment, creating medical records, and practicing good communication, collaboration, and leadership. Using real-life scenarios and application-driven activities, students learn the responsibilities and challenges of being health care professionals. In addition to building their understanding of technical concepts and skills, students evaluate the qualifications required for specific careers and develop personal career plans to pursue work in the health care industry. Introduction to Health Science is an introductory-level Career and Technical Education course for programs of study in health sciences. This course is aligned with state and national standards.
  • Intermediate Health Science1
  • Intermediate Health Science extends the foundations of the Introduction to Health Science course and covers basic medical science, terminology, procedures, and regulations. This course will help guide students toward choosing a specific career path in health services, including career paths in emergency medicine, nutrition, and alternative medicine. Using real-life scenarios and application-driven activities, students will extend their knowledge of oral and written communication in health science. Students will have an overview of physiology and medical measurements. Students will also synthesize learning from the Introduction to Health Science course by engaging in analysis of real-life scenarios and deepen their knowledge of various career options. In addition, students will expand their understanding of health and safety systems, how to address emergency situations, and deal with infection control issues. Intermediate Health Science is an intermediate-level Career and Technical Education course for programs of study in health sciences. This course is aligned with state and national standards.
  • Principles of Health Science
  • Principles of Health Science provides knowledge and skills students need for careers in health care. Students explore the services, structure, and professions of the health care system and get guidance on choosing a specific career path in health services, including career paths in emergency medicine, nutrition, and alternative medicine. Students focus on day-to-day skills and expectations for health professionals, which include promoting wellness, maintaining a safe environment, creating medical records, and practicing good communication, collaboration, and leadership. In addition, students will expand their understanding of health and safety systems, how to address emergency situations, and deal with infection control issues. Students will also explore topics in medical science, terminology, procedures, and regulations - including an overview of physiology and medical measurements. Using real-life scenarios and application-driven activities, students learn the responsibilities and challenges of being health care professionals and deepen their knowledge of various career options. In addition to building their understanding of technical concepts and skills, students evaluate the qualifications required for specific careers and develop personal career plans to pursue work in the health care industry and extend their knowledge of oral and written communication in health science. This course is aligned with state and national standards.
  • Introduction to Business and Technology
  • Introduction to Business and Technology provides the foundational knowledge and skills students need for careers in business and technology. Throughout the course, students gain a knowledge of business principles and communication skills, an understanding of the impact of financial and marketing decisions, and proficiency in the technologies required by business. Students will also learn the essentials of working in a business environment, managing a business, and owning a business.

    This course allows students to explore careers in business and information technology while learning skills applicable to any professional setting. Through a variety of hands-on activities, students will engage with word processing, presentation, and spreadsheet software and explore operating systems, networking, and the Internet. Regular engagement in active learning ensures students can continually refine the skills necessary to prepare them for work. In addition, students will evaluate the qualifications required for specific careers so they can identify opportunities of interest to them.

    This course is built to state and national standards. Students who successfully complete the course will be prepared to pursue certifications such as Microsoft® Office Specialist certifications in Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Access, as well as IC3 certification.
  • Legal Environment of Business
    Legal Environment of Business examines the role of the law on all aspects of business ownership and management. Throughout the course, students focus on legal ethics, court procedures, torts, contracts, consumer law, property law, employment law, environmental law, and international law. Students also explore the impact of laws, regulations, and judicial decisions on society at large.This course allows students to explore careers in business while learning skills applicable to any professional setting. Through a series of hands-on activities, students will prepare legal documents, create a compliance plan, and research consumer protection issues. Regular engagement in active learning ensures students can continually refine the skills necessary to prepare them for work. In addition, students will evaluate the qualifications required for specific careers so they can identify opportunities of interest to them.This course is built to state and national standards. Students who successfully complete the course will be prepared to pursue certifications such as Accredited Legal Professional, Certified Administrative Manager, or Certified Associate in Project Management®.
  • Human Resources Principles
    Human Resources Principles examines the main functions of human resources management, including planning, recruitment, selection, training, development, compensation, and evaluation. In so doing, the course provides students with the tools to hire, manage, and fire employees. Students will also explore the unique role of human resources in the larger organization.

    This course allows students to explore careers in business while learning skills applicable to any professional setting. Through a series of hands-on activities, students will create a recruiting plan, develop a strategy to promote a positive organizational culture, and analyze the impact of globalization on the human resources. Regular engagement in active learning ensures students can continually refine the skills necessary to prepare them for work. In addition, students will evaluate the qualifications required for specific careers so they can identify opportunities of interest to them.

    This course is built to state and national standards. Students who successfully complete the course will be prepared to pursue certifications such as Associate Professional in Human ResourcesTM, Certified Administrative Manager, or Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM)®.

1Course is 0.5 credit
*Microsoft is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.

Writing Performance

Performance in writing is critical for success in school, the workplace, and in personal development. Full-time students and part-time students completing core graduation requirements in English Language Arts write a minimum of two writing samples at different times in the school year. Students demonstrate their proficiency in the 6 Traits rubric: ideas, organization, voice, sentence fluency, word choice and conventions. Throughout the year, Brightmont teachers work with students one-to-one to develop their writing skills in areas of weakness. In the 2016-17 school year, Brightmont students showed growth in all 6 traits of writing.