Accredited Private School, Grades 6-12


Curriculum

Choose from More Than 80 Courses for Credit

Students can complete a wide variety of 6th- to 12th-grade courses at Brightmont Academy for original credit or credit recovery. With our effective, one-to-one instruction, students experience fully personalized pacing, instructional materials, and motivators.

Brightmont partners with local schools to simplify the credit transfer process and, as needed, tailor the curriculum to match specific school and district requirements. This includes courses designed to align with the Common Core standards.

Full Course List

English

The following courses are offered for up to 1.0 credit unless otherwise specified.

  • Language Arts 6
    Language Arts 6 integrates all facets of language arts, using selected novels, short stories, and poems. Students write a book report, a character sketch, a short story, an explanatory essay, and a persuasive essay. Within the context of reading and writing, students develop their understanding of basic grammar and writing conventions, including the parts of speech, sentence and paragraph structure, and how to use the writing process. Vocabulary and basic reading skills such as fluency, speed, and comprehension are also increased through challenging reading selections.
  • Language Arts 7
    Language Arts 7 uses an integrated approach to the development of language skills. Students read selected novels, short stories, and poems while also developing their written composition skills. Students write book reports, descriptions, and research reports. Throughout the course students increase their grammar skills by writing complete sentences and paragraphs and by using transitions. They also learn how to properly cite sources in research reports.
  • Language Arts 8
    The Language Arts 8 course offers an integrated approach to the continued development of language skills. Students strengthen their skills in reading, grammar, mechanics, the writing process, vocabulary, and public speaking. Students are challenged to comprehend, synthesize, and evaluate novels, short stories, and poems that they read. Written compositions include expository, persuasive, and narrative essays. Students also learn the key skills required for effective presentations and deliver a final speech to a live audience.
  • English 92
    Students enrolled in English 9 are challenged to think critically about selected novels, short stories, and poems. Students write character sketches and essays analyzing, critiquing, and reviewing literature. In the context of developing more advanced analytical skills, students continue to improve their grammar, spelling, vocabulary, reading comprehension, and reading fluency.
  • English 102
    English 10 is designed to increase students’ critical reading and writing skills through the reading and analysis of selected works of world literature, including novels, short stories, poems, and a play. Writing assignments include character sketches, comparing and contrasting, literary analysis, a persuasive essay, and a critique or review of a selected written work. In-depth skill building is integrated into the course work to develop further competency in grammar, conventions, and style.
  • English 112
    The English 11 course offers students the opportunity to study American and British literature. Students read novels, plays, short stories, and poems that reflect cultural changes over a broad span of history. Students also explore the biographies of the authors they are reading and seek to identify author bias in literature. Students write essays to deepen their understanding of literature, culture, and the writing process while continuing to sharpen their skills in grammar, conventions, vocabulary, and style.
  • English 122
    Students taking English 12 are challenged to engage in a detailed analysis of two complex novels that they read, research, and analyze for bias, perspective, and style. Students present a final project that includes a paper and a speech. In addition, students continue to broaden their range of writing by composing their own poetry and fine-tuning their use of grammar and English conventions.
  • American Literature
    The American Literature course offers students the opportunity to study American literature. Students read novels, plays, short stories, and poems that reflect cultural changes over a broad span of history. Students also explore the biographies of the authors they are reading and seek to identify author bias in literature. Students write essays to deepen their understanding of literature, culture, and the writing process while continuing to sharpen their skills in grammar, conventions, vocabulary, and style.
  • British and World Literature
    Students taking British Literature are challenged to engage in a detailed analysis of two complex British novels that they read, research, and analyze for bias, perspective, and style. Students present a final project that includes a paper and a speech. In addition, students continue to broaden their range of writing by composing their own poetry and fine-tuning their use of grammar and English conventions.
  • Shakespeare
    The Shakespeare course provides students with a working knowledge of Shakespeare’s plays by examining the historical context and aspects of human nature portrayed in each play. The class explores the following plays: Romeo and Juliet, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Henry V, Macbeth, and Hamlet.
  • Creative Writing1
    Creative Writing focuses on the exploration of short fiction and poetry, culminating in a written portfolio that includes a revised short story and 3-5 polished poems. Elements of fiction writing explored in this course include attention to detail, observation, character development, setting, plot, and point of view. In addition to applying literary craft elements in guided creative writing exercises, students engage in critical reading activities designed to illustrate the writing craft of a diverse group of authors.
  • Media Literacy1
    Media Literacy teaches students how to build the critical thinking, writing, and reading skills required in a media-rich and increasingly technocentric world. A major topic in the course is non-traditional media reading skills, including how to approach, analyze, and respond to advertisements, blogs, websites, social media, news media, and wikis. Students also engage in a variety of writing activities in non-traditional media genres, such as blogging and podcast scripting. Students consider their positions as consumers of media and explore ways to use non-traditional media to become more active and thoughtful citizens.

1Course is 0.5 credit
2Common Core Aligned

Math

The following courses are offered for up to 1.0 credit unless otherwise specified.

  • Math 6
    Math 6 begins by reinforcing the basic operations, decimals, fractions, and problem-solving skills learned in elementary school. It builds on this knowledge base by introducing and applying the concepts of ratios, percentages, and basic probabilities. Students get hands-on practice using graphs, measurements, and metrics to solve problems. Connections with social studies are explored through a math history project.
  • Math 7
    The Math 7 course builds on the foundation of Math 6. Fractions, ratios, proportions, percentages, and probability are revisited as students build their repertoire of problem-solving strategies. Students are introduced to the vocabulary and formulas of two- and three-dimensional geometry as they explore perimeter, area, and volume. Measurement and metrics skills are applied to real-world practical problems. Variables and algebraic expressions are introduced in the context of questions familiar to students. Students also investigate the connections between math and history through a math history project.
  • Math 8
    Math 8 marks the beginning of pre-algebra as students develop their skills with variables, algebraic expressions, and equations. Exponents and square roots are introduced and explored. Students develop a strong conceptual understanding of integers (positive and negative numbers) and apply that understanding to solve problems. Knowledge gained from previous math courses is revisited and applied in new ways. Connections with social studies are explored through a math history project.
  • General Math
    General Math offers students the opportunity to strengthen necessary high school mathematical skills. Problem-solving strategies are developed and applied to fractions, proportions, percentages, integers (positive and negative numbers), exponents, and square roots. Students reinforce their understanding of geometry as they explore perimeter, area, volume, measurement, and metrics. The course builds a strong foundation for understanding algebra as students use variables, algebraic expressions, and equations. Students explore the connections between math and history by completing a math history project.
  • Pre-Algebra
    In Pre-Algebra, variables, algebraic expressions, and equations are introduced as powerful tools for problem solving. Students sharpen their understanding of fractions, percentages, proportions, and probability as they strategize solutions to multistep problems. Students develop a conceptual understanding of exponents, square roots, and negative numbers, and they explore connections between history and mathematics through a math history project.
  • Algebra I2
    Algebra I offers students the opportunity to develop and apply their algebraic understanding to solve increasingly complex problems. Students become familiar with exponents, roots, and radicals in the context of manipulating and factoring polynomials. They learn to write and solve systems of equations as a strategy for solving word problems. Students evaluate rational expressions, and graph, solve, and apply linear equations and inequalities. They also explore problems of probability.
  • Geometry2
    In Geometry, students develop their reasoning skills as they explore relationships within and among lines, angles, triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, and circles. Congruence, similarity, and the Pythagorean theorem are introduced and applied. Students calculate the surface area of three-dimensional shapes. Their spatial reasoning is exercised as they investigate geometric transformations. Students increase the precision of their deductive reasoning skills as they construct geometric proofs.
  • Algebra II/Trigonometry2
    Algebra II/Trigonometry introduces students to powerful algebraic tools and problem-solving strategies. Students learn strategies for simplifying and solving equations and inequalities containing radical expressions. Students explore multiple techniques for solving systems of equations and are introduced to matrices. The quadratic formula and other methods of solving quadratic equations are introduced and applied. Students explore connections between algebra and geometry as they graph the equations of conic sections: parabolas, circles, ellipses, and hyperbolas. This course also includes an introduction to the concepts of trigonometry and an investigation of discrete mathematics and probability.
  • Math Analysis
    Math Analysis reviews linear, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions and their graphs. Trigonometry is covered intensively with topics including trigonometric functions, analytic trigonometry, the law of sines, the law of cosines, and vectors. Additional topics include matrices, sequences, series, probability, and analytic geometry.
  • Integrated Math I2
    Integrated Math I provides a first-year integrated math curriculum that combines material traditionally covered in high school algebra, geometry, and statistics courses. Within the course, a balance is struck between task-based discovery and focused development of skills and conceptual understanding. Course topics include function families, propositional logic, polynomials and factoring, similarity and congruence properties of triangles, introductory probability and statistics, square roots, rational expressions, and coordinate geometry.
  • Integrated Math II2
    Integrated Math II provides a second-year integrated math curriculum that combines material traditionally covered in high school algebra, geometry, and precalculus courses. The course develops rigorous mathematical skills while emphasizing real-world applications. Course topics include complex numbers, step and piecewise functions, exponential functions, quadratic functions, inverse functions, right triangles, trigonometric functions, and circles, as well as data analysis and modeling.
  • Integrated Math III2
    Integrated Math III introduces students to powerful algebraic tools and problem-solving strategies. Students learn strategies for simplifying and solving equations and inequalities containing radical expressions. Students explore multiple techniques for solving systems of equations and are introduced to matrices. The quadratic formula and other methods of solving quadratic equations are introduced and applied. Students explore connections between algebra and geometry as they graph the equations of conic sections: parabolas, circles, ellipses, and hyperbolas. This course also includes an introduction to the concepts of trigonometry and an investigation of discrete mathematics and probability.
  • Pre-Calculus
    Pre-Calculus is a course that combines reviews of algebra, geometry, and functions into a preparatory course for calculus. The course focuses on the mastery of critical skills and exposure to new skills necessary for success in subsequent math courses. The first semester includes linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, radical, polynomial, and rational functions, as well as systems of equations and conic sections. The second semester covers trigonometric ratios and functions; inverse trigonometric functions; applications of trigonometry, including vectors and the laws of sines and cosines; polar functions and notation; and arithmetic of complex numbers.
  • Calculus
    In the Calculus course, students develop an understanding of the concepts and applications of calculus, including first and second derivatives, geometric and physical applications of indefinite and definite integrals, inverse and trigonometric functions, exponentials, and logarithms.
  • Probability & Introduction to Statistics
    Probability & Introduction to Statistics provides a curriculum focused on understanding key data analysis and probabilistic concepts, calculations, and relevance to real-world applications. This course covers topics such as types of data, common methods used to collect data, and the various representations of data, including histograms, bar graphs, box plots, and scatterplots. Students learn to work with data by analyzing and employing methods of prediction, specifically involving samples, populations, distributions, summary statistics, regression analysis, transformations, simulations, and inference.
  • Mathematics of Personal Finance
    Mathematics of Personal Finance focuses on real-world financial literacy, personal finance, and business subjects. Students apply what they learned in Algebra I and Geometry to topics such as personal income, taxes, checking and savings accounts, credit, loans and payments, car leasing and purchasing, home mortgages, stocks, insurance, and retirement planning. Students also extend their investigations using more advanced mathematics, such as systems of equations when studying cost and profit issues and exponential functions when calculating interest problems.

1Course is 0.5 credit
2Common Core Aligned

Science

The following courses are offered for up to 1.0 credit unless otherwise specified.

  • Science 6
    In Science 6 students learn about Earth and its place in the universe. Subject areas include geology, the oceans, light, electricity, magnetism, and the solar system. Students are challenged to inquire into this foundational information based on their specific areas of interest. Using a wide array of resources, students investigate the physical world in which they live and are introduced to the ideas of great scientific thinkers including Copernicus, Galileo, Newton, and Einstein.
  • Science 7
    Science 7 provides an introduction to biology. Students are introduced to the kingdoms of life (monerans, protists, fungi, animals, and plants), genetics, DNA and RNA, the theory of evolution, and human anatomy using a wide array of resources including textbooks, the Internet, library materials, and interactive software. The course’s specific focus is on developing a solid foundation and understanding of the content.
  • Science 8
    In Science 8, students are challenged to understand and evaluate current environmental trends and their impact on humans. The focus is on the interdependency and connectedness of different life systems. Content resources include textbooks, library resources, the Internet, expert interviews, primary and secondary sources, and software. Students research and present information in customized projects on topics such as the food chain, energy, human populations, land use, and pollution.
  • Life Science
    In the Life Science course, students explore the marvels of life by studying cells, genetics, human anatomy, plant anatomy, and microscopic life. Students are challenged to analyze the value of current research findings and processes, such as the mapping of the human genome. A variety of materials are used and customized for the individual student. Each student presents a final research paper or project to complete the course.
  • Earth Science
    The focus of the Earth Science course is to build an introductory understanding of the history and structures of the planet Earth and its place within the solar system. Students are challenged to critically analyze current theories about the evolution of Earth and compare and contrast them to theories from other periods of history. A wide variety of resources are used, and each is specifically tailored to the individual student’s learning style. This course culminates in a presentation of a final research paper or project.
  • Environmental Science
  • Physical Science
    Physical Science offers students an introduction to the fundamentals of physics and chemistry, including basic principles of force, motion, matter, energy, light, sound, and magnetism. Students conduct hands-on experiments as they learn about the scientific method of gathering knowledge. The course concludes with a final presentation of a research paper or project.
  • Biology
    Students enrolled in Biology study the physical structures and functions of plants, animals, and humans. They explore cell structure, the processes of mitosis and meiosis, plant anatomy, human anatomy, genetics, and the theory of evolution. In addition to conducting experiments using microscopes, students dissect a virtual pig and look closely at internal human anatomy through the use of interactive software. Students present a final paper or project upon completion of the course.
  • Anatomy1
    Anatomy is an extension of the Biology course, focusing specifically on the human body. This is an opportunity for students to explore body systems and genetics in greater depth. The course concludes with a final presentation of a research paper or project.
  • Chemistry (non-lab)
    Chemistry offers students the opportunity to deepen their understanding of the physical world and to apply their mathematical skills to solving chemical equations. Students are introduced to atomic structure and weights, the periodic table, chemical bonding, the mole concept, gases, solids, liquids, solutions, chemical equilibrium, acids, and bases. They learn to calculate molecular and formulaic weights and to balance chemical equations. The course concludes with a final presentation of a research paper or project.
  • Physics
    In this Physics course, students examine force and its effects, light and sound, electricity and magnetism, energy resources, the solar system, and gravity. Students conduct hands-on experiments and complete virtual labs to enhance their understanding of gravity, acceleration, optics, and circuits.

1Course is 0.5 credit

Social Studies

The following courses are offered for up to 1.0 credit unless otherwise specified.

  • Social Studies 6
    The countries comprising the western hemisphere constitute the focus of Social Studies 6, with particular attention paid to their geography, government structures, trade, industry, and current events. Students will demonstrate comprehension through the use of texts, interactive software, and the Internet to create four America biography projects and one speech or formal paper.
  • Social Studies 7
    The scope of Social Studies 7 embraces Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. Students will deepen their understanding of these cultures with respect to the government structures, geographical features, and cultural practices of these societies. This course requires one compare-and-contrast project.
  • Social Studies 8
  • U.S. History
    It is important to understand the past in order to make sound decisions for the future. In U.S. History, students are challenged to look at key events in our nation’s history and how they affect us today. Students use textbooks, library resources, and the Internet and conclude their study with a presentation of a historical timeline and two research papers or projects.
  • U.S. History to the Civil War
  • U.S. History since the Civil War
  • World History
    World History offers students the opportunity to explore ancient cultures, Europe, Asia, South America, the Middle East, and Africa. Students use a variety of resources to understand the complexity of the world in which we live. Students also study geography and its impact on human history. They complete research papers on topics of their choice throughout the course.
  • World History to the Rennaissance
  • Modern World History
  • American Government1
    American Government is an introductory course designed to familiarize students with the foundations of the U.S. government, the fundamentals of citizenship and America’s relations with, and responsibilities to, the rest of the world. Students will complete a constitution project, a research paper on a government career, and one appropriate essay topic of the student’s choice.
  • Contemporary World Affairs1
    Contemporary World Affairs surveys world history from the end of WWII to the present. The class is designed to give students an awareness of how current events are shaped by past events, and an important goal of the course is to understand the role the United States plays in today’s world. The class combines ideas from world geography, U.S. history, world history, and U.S. government. In addition, the international economy, world hot spots, and comparative views of world events are studied in a contemporary context.
  • Geography and World Cultures1
    Geography and World Cultures enables students to explore how geographic features, human relationships, political and social structures, economics, science and technology, and the arts have developed and influenced life in countries around the world. In this course, students are given rigorous instruction on how to read and create maps, charts, and graphs. The course develops note-taking skills, teaches the basic elements of analytic writing, and introduces students to the close examination of primary documents.
  • Multicultural Studies1
    Multicultural Studies is a course that examines the United States as a multicultural nation. It emphasizes the perspectives of minority groups while allowing students from all backgrounds to better understand and appreciate how race, culture, ethnicity, and identity contribute to their experiences. Major topics in the course include identity, immigration, assimilation and distinctiveness, power and oppression, struggles for rights, regionalism, culture and the media, and the formation of new cultures.
  • Psychology1
    Psychology provides an overview of the field’s major domains: methods, biopsychology, cognitive and developmental psychology, and variations in individual and group behavior. By focusing on significant scientific research and on the questions that are most important to psychologists, students see psychology as an evolving science. Each topic clusters around challenge questions, such as “What is happiness?” Students answer these questions before, during, and after they interact with direct instruction.
  • Sociology1
    Sociology examines why people think and behave as they do in relationships, groups, institutions, and societies. Major course topics include individual and group identity, social structures and institutions, social change, social stratification, social dynamics in recent and current events, the effects of social change on individuals, and the research methods used by social scientists.
  • U.S. and Global Economics1
    U.S. and Global Economics provides an introduction to key economic principles and covers fundamental properties of economics. Topics include an examination of markets from both historical and current perspectives; the basics of supply and demand; the theories of early economic philosophers; theories of value; the concept of money and how it evolved; the role of banks, investment houses, and the Federal Reserve; Keynesian economics; the productivity, wages, investment, and growth involved in capitalism; unemployment; inflations; and the national debt. The course also includes a survey of markets in areas such as China, Europe, and the Middle East.
  • Washington State History1
    “Why is it important to know your state’s history?” is the question that guides the learning process throughout this Washington State History course. Using an integrated and customized approach, students learn about Washington’s landforms, American Indians, expansion, government, and economy. They explore the state’s growth and development by creating a timeline and a research paper on a topic of their choice.
  • Washington State/Pacific Rim History
    This course expands upon concepts covered in Washington State History by including a study of Pacific Rim countries. Students analyze the unique characteristics of each country and how nations cooperate and depend on one another.

1Course is 0.5 credit

World Languages

  • Spanish I
    Spanish I is an introductory foreign language course designed to help students build a foundation of knowledge regarding the structure of the Spanish language. Students learn to communicate using basic Spanish phrases, the present tense, numbers, dates, time, colors, weather, and basic descriptions.
  • Spanish II
    Spanish II builds upon the foundation of Spanish I to expand communication skills. The course includes components of vocabulary, grammar, reading comprehension, listening comprehension, and written expression.
  • Spanish Culture II
    Spanish Culture II builds upon the foundation of Spanish I to expand communication skills in this foreign language. The course includes components of grammar, reading comprehension, listening comprehension, and written expression, similar to a traditional Spanish II curriculum, but also includes an extensive cultural research component that allows students to focus intensively on a Spanish-speaking country. As this course covers less vocabulary than might be included in a typical Spanish II course, students should consult with the instructor to determine whether their next course placement should be Spanish II or Spanish III.
  • Spanish III
    Spanish III expands the grammar studies of Spanish II to all verb tenses and includes the subjunctive mood. The course offers an introduction to literature and integrates writing components. This course is primarily taught in Spanish.
  • Spanish IV
    Spanish IV reinforces and expands knowledge of grammar usage. Students learn how to understand and interpret written and spoken Spanish. Through studying Hispanic literature, film and current media, this course offers an exploration of Hispanic countries’ cultures including sub cultures in the United States. This course is primarily taught in Spanish.

(other languages may be available)

Fine Arts

The following courses are offered for up to 1.0 credit unless otherwise specified.

  • History of Cinema
    This course presents an introduction to international film history, focusing in particular on certain moments and themes made important for technological, aesthetic, social and economic reasons. In addition to studying the history of cinema, we will analyze the various ways of doing history, i.e., historiography, employed in the narratives film historians construct. Throughout the course we will learn how to develop a historical appreciation of film based on a survey of cinematic traditions contained within narrative, documentary, and experimental forms, and acquire a critical, technical, and aesthetic vocabulary relating to particular cinematic practices and structures. We will examine how meaning in films is conditioned by the uses of camera, editing, lightning, sound and acting, explore the impact of technological developments on film production, and evaluate the importance of genre and the legacy of individual “auteurs” throughout the history of cinema.
  • Art Appreciation1
    Art Appreciation is a survey of the history of Western visual arts, with a primary focus on painting. Students begin with an introduction to the basic principles of painting and learn how to critique and compare works of art. While Western art is the course’s primary focus, students also study artistic traditions from Africa, Asia, Oceania, and the Americas. Coverage of each artistic movement highlights historical context and introduces students to key artists who represent a variety of geographical locations. Throughout the course, students apply what they have learned about critiquing to analyze and evaluate both individual artists and individual works of art.
  • Music Appreciation
    Music Appreciation introduces students to the history, theory, and genres of music, from the most primitive surviving examples, through classical, to the most contemporary music in the world at large. The course covers primitive musical forms, classical music, and American jazz, and also presents rich modern traditions, including gospel, folk, soul, blues, Latin rhythms, rock and roll, and hip-hop. Students explore the interface of music and social movements and examine how the emergent global society and the Internet are bringing musical forms together in new ways.

1Course is 0.5 credit

Life Skills

  • College and Career Preparation I1
    In College and Career Preparation I, students obtain a deeper understanding of what it means to be ready for college, including the college application process, what it takes to be a successful college student, and how to begin thinking about their careers. Students learn about the importance of high school performance in college admissions, how to prepare for college testing, and the types of schools and degrees they may choose to pursue after high school. They also gain exposure to the financial resources available that can make college attainable. Students come away from this course understanding how smart preparation and skill development in high school can lead to expansive career opportunities after they have completed their education and are ready for the working world.
  • College and Career Preparation II1
    College and Career Preparation II builds on the lessons and skills in College and Career Preparation I and provides a step-by-step guide to choosing a college. It walks students through the process of filling out an application (with opportunities to practice) and takes an in-depth look at the various college admission tests and assessments, as well financial aid options. The course also instructs students in interviewing techniques and provides career guidance. Students explore valuable career-preparation opportunities such as job shadowing and internships. (College and Career Preparation I is not a prerequisite.)
  • Financial Literacy1
    Financial Literacy helps students recognize and develop vital skills that connect life and career goals with personalized strategies and milestone-based action plans. Students explore concepts and work toward mastery of personal finance skills, deepening their understanding of key ideas and extending their knowledge in a variety of problem-solving applications. Course topics include career planning; income, taxation, and budgeting; savings accounts, checking accounts, and electronic banking; interest, investments, and stocks; cash, debit, credit, and credit scores; insurance; and consumer advice on how to buy a car or a house, including buying, renting, and leasing options.

1Course is 0.5 credit

Health/PE

The following courses are offered for up to 1.0 credit unless otherwise specified.

  • Health1
    Health consists of units on nutrition, exercise, addiction, disease, the human body, reproduction, decision-making, and conflict resolution. Students explore concepts through assigned fiction and nonfiction readings, research, and discussion. The American Red Cross provides CPR instruction and certification.
  • Nutrition
    The Nutrition course provides students with comprehensive knowledge of wellness and its importance. Students learn about the new food pyramid and how to make it work for them, the importance of exercise and how to fit it into their busy schedules, and the role vitamins play in health. Additionally, students use active inquiry to examine the problem of obesity in America, the dangers of fast food and how to avoid them, and how food advertising can trick consumers. The goal is to help students better advocate for their own personal health and wellness.
  • Sports Appreciation
    Sports Appreciation is a course designed to provide students a general education or an awareness of sports and activities for individual and team participants as well as other recreational or leisure activities that can be enjoyed for a lifetime. Students learn sports history, rules, etiquette, scoring, training, strategies, methods, skills, techniques, required equipment, equipment selection, uniforms or appropriate clothing, location or facilities, common injuries, and more. Students also become familiar with the names of affiliated sports organizations at local, state, national, and international levels; famous athletes; books, publications, and movies about sports; and current sporting events.
  • Physical Education1

1Course is 0.5 credit

Foundations

The following courses are offered for up to 1.0 credit unless otherwise specified.

  • Math Foundations
    The Math Foundations course covers foundational concepts and skills — including basic vocabulary — to build or strengthen a base on which to develop understanding of more difficult mathematical concepts in future courses. Topics include basic number concepts such as whole numbers, counting, and place value; advanced number concepts such as rounding, exponents, and negative numbers; addition and subtraction; multiplication and division; fractions and operations with fractions; decimals, percents, and ratios; estimation; problem solving; basic concepts in geometry; and measuring shapes. This course includes audio resources in both English and Spanish to assist students with language, reading, or other learning difficulties.
  • Reading Skills and Strategies
    Reading Skills and Strategies is designed for special education students and for students unable to enroll in an appropriate grade-level course. Students enrolling in this course demonstrate significant deficits on entrance assessments. The focus of this remedial class is to build basic skills. Upon completion of the course, the student should show at least one year’s growth on an exit assessment; however, the student may still demonstrate skills significantly below grade level.
  • Science Foundations
    Science Foundations provides students with opportunities to develop the knowledge, skills, and strategies necessary for success in rigorous high school science courses. The course is appropriate for use as remediation at the high school level or as a bridge to high school.
  • Study Skills
    Study skills are an essential component for success in the classroom. This course provides instruction in strategies for organization, maintaining an assignment calendar, time management, note taking, and test taking. These skills may be applied directly to assignments from a content-based course for the greatest benefit. Course instructors act as coaches when students apply these skills to assignments.
  • Writing Skills and Strategies
    The Writing Skills and Strategies course is designed for special education students and for students unable to enroll in an appropriate grade-level course. Students enrolled in this class have demonstrated significant deficits on entrance assessments; the focus of this remedial class is to build basic skills. Upon completion of the course, the student should show at least one year’s growth on an exit assessment; however, the student may still demonstrate skills significantly below grade level.

1Course is 0.5 credit

NCAA

  • Choose from 50+ NCAA-approved courses
  • Visit the NCAA high school portal website and enter "Brightmont Academy" as the school to view a full list of approved courses

Honors

Most of the standard college-prep courses listed are available as honors courses. Consult with the Campus Director for details.

Advanced Placement

Authorized by the College Board, these Advanced Placement (AP)* courses meet the higher-education expectations of college-level courses and prepare students to demonstrate achievement through success on the AP exams.

English

  • AP English Language and Composition
    In AP* English Language and Composition, students learn to understand and analyze complex styles of writing by reading works from a variety of authors. They’ll explore the richness of language, including syntax, imitation, word choice, and tone. They’ll also learn about their own composition style and process, starting with exploration, planning, and writing, and continuing through editing, peer review, rewriting, polishing, and applying what they learn to a breadth of academic, personal, and professional contexts. The equivalent of an introductory-level college class, this course prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in communications, creative writing, journalism, literature, and composition.
  • AP English Literature and Composition
    AP* English Literature and Composition immerses students in novels, plays, poems, and short stories from various periods. Students will read and write daily, using a variety of multimedia and interactive activities, interpretive writing assignments, and class discussions to assess and improve their skills and knowledge. The course places special emphasis on reading comprehension, structural and critical analysis of written works, literary vocabulary, and recognizing and understanding literary devices. The equivalent of an introductory-college level class, this course prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in creative writing, communications, journalism, literature, and composition.

Math

  • AP Calculus AB
    In AP* Calculus AB, students learn to understand change geometrically and visually (by studying graphs of curves), analytically (by studying and working with mathematical formulas), numerically (by seeing patterns in sets of numbers), and verbally. Instead of simply getting the right answer, students learn to evaluate the soundness of proposed solutions and to apply mathematical reasoning to real-world models. Calculus helps scientists, engineers, and financial analysts understand the complex relationships behind real-world phenomena. The equivalent of an introductory-level college calculus course, AP Calculus AB prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in science, engineering, and mathematics.
  • AP Statistics
    AP* Statistics gives students hands-on experience collecting, analyzing, graphing, and interpreting real-world data. They will learn to effectively design and analyze research studies by reviewing and evaluating real research. The next time they hear the results from another poll or study, they will know whether the results are valid. As the art of drawing conclusions from imperfect data and the science of real-world uncertainties, statistics plays an important role in many fields. The equivalent of an introductory-level college course, AP Statistics prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in science, sociology, medicine, engineering, political science, geography, and business.

Science

  • AP Biology
    AP* Biology builds students’ understanding of biology on both the micro and macro scales. After studying cell biology, students move on to understand how evolution drives the diversity and unity of life. Students will examine how living systems store, retrieve, transmit, and respond to information and the processes used by organisms to utilize free energy. The equivalent of an introductory-level college biology course, AP Biology prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in science, health sciences, and engineering.
  • AP Chemistry
    AP* Chemistry builds students’ understanding of the nature and reactivity of matter. After studying the structure of atoms, molecules, and ions, students move on to solve quantitative chemical problems and explore how molecular structure relates to chemical and physical properties. Students will examine the molecular composition of common substances and learn to predictably transform them through chemical reactions. The equivalent of an introductory-level college chemistry course, AP Chemistry prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in science, health sciences, and engineering.
  • AP Environmental Science
  • AP Psychology1
    AP* Psychology provides an overview of current psychological research methods and theories. Students will explore the therapies used by professional counselors and clinical psychologists and examine the reasons for normal human reactions: how people learn and think, the process of human development and human aggression, altruism, intimacy, and self-reflection. They’ll study core psychological concepts, such as the brain and sense functions, and learn to gauge human reactions, gather information, and form meaningful syntheses. Along the way, students will also investigate relevant concepts like study skills and information retention. The equivalent of an introductory-level college course, AP Psychology prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in psychology and life sciences.

Social Studies

  • AP Macroeconomics1
    In AP* Macroeconomics, students learn why and how the world economy can change from month to month, how to identify trends in our economy, and how to use those trends to develop performance measures and predictors of economic growth or decline. They’ll also examine how individuals, institutions, and influences affect people, and how those factors can impact everyone’s life through employment rates, government spending, inflation, taxes, and production. The equivalent of an introductory-level college class, this course prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in business, political science and history.
  • AP Microeconomics1
    AP* Microeconomics studies the behavior of individuals and businesses as they exchange goods and services in the marketplace. Students will learn why the same product costs different amounts at different stores, in different cities, at different times. They’ll also learn to spot patterns in economic behavior and how to use those patterns to explain buyer and seller behavior under various conditions. Microeconomics studies the economic way of thinking, understanding the nature and function of markets, the role of scarcity and competition, the influence of factors such as interest rates on business decisions, and the role of government in promoting a healthy economy. The equivalent an introductory-level college course, AP Microeconomics prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in business, history, and political science.
  • AP U.S. Government and Politics1
    AP* U.S. Government and Politics studies the operations and structure of the U.S. government and the behavior of the electorate and politicians. Students will gain the analytic perspective necessary to critically evaluate political data, hypotheses, concepts, opinions, and processes. Along the way, they’ll learn how to gather data about political behavior and develop their own theoretical analysis of American politics. They’ll also build the skills they need to examine general propositions about government and politics, and to analyze the specific relationships between political, social, and economic institutions. The equivalent of an introductory-level college course, AP U.S. Government and Politics prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in political science, law, education, business, and history.
  • AP U.S. History
    AP* U.S. History analyzes and explores the economic, political, and social changes in America since Columbus. Students master historical knowledge and critical analysis, build reading, writing, and communication skills, and discover how historical events have contributed to American culture. In the process, they’ll learn how decisions and events of the past continue to have profound effects on the world today and how knowledge of the causes behind past events can influence future decisions. By the end of the course, students will be ready to put their factual knowledge to work by weighing evidence and interpreting problems presented by historians. The equivalent of an introductory-level college course, AP U.S. History prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in history, political science, economics, sociology, and law.

World Languages

  • AP Spanish Language
    In AP* Spanish Language students perfect their Spanish speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing skills. They study the vocabulary, grammar, and cultural aspects of the language, and then apply what they’ve learned in extensive written and spoken exercises. By the end of the course, students will have an expansive vocabulary and a solid, working knowledge of all verb forms and tenses. The equivalent of a college-level language course, AP Spanish Language prepares students for the AP exam and for further study of Spanish language, culture, or literature.

1Course is 0.5 credit
*Advanced Placement and AP are registered trademarks of the College Board. This course has been authorized by the College Board to use the AP designation.

Sophia College Courses

Dual College and High School Credit courses

  • English Composition 1
    Sophia's English Composition I course takes you through the stages of the writing process, from brainstorming and drafting through revision and proofreading. Students will strengthen their writing skills and become more engaged readers and stronger critical thinkers.
  • College Algebra
    Sophia's College Algebra course helps you build mastery around linear, non­-linear, and other mathematical functions that include algebraic, graphic, and numeric properties. Demonstrate the application of these concepts through Sophia's scenario­-based activities designed around real world situations that help you apply this knowledge in both personal and professional settings.
  • Introduction to Statistics
    Sophia's Introduction to Statistics course helps you gain mastery of the basic principles of statistics. In this course, you will learn a variety of topics, including statistical principles, research methodologies, data analysis, and hypothesis testing. You will also have the opportunity to demonstrate the application of these topics in statistics to everyday situations.
  • Environmental Science
    Sophia's Environmental Science course will help you develop an understanding of the scientific principles and processes that shape our environment, as well as the impact of human activities. You will apply knowledge of a wide range of environmental issues and policies in context, exploring topics such as natural resources, endangered species, pollution, and climate change.
  • Human Biology
    Sophia's Human Biology course helps you analyze fundamental biological principles from a human perspective. The Human Biology topics include the molecular and cellular basis of life, genetics, organ systems, and the impact of nutrition and exercise on human health.
  • Introduction to Psychology
    Sophia's Introduction to Psychology course helps you understand the basic principles of psychology and the scientific methods. In this course, you will study a variety of topics, including the brain, learning and memory, personality, social influence, child and lifespan development, and psychopathology. You will also have the ability to demonstrate the application of these psychology topics to everyday situations.
  • Introduction to Sociology
    Sophia's Introduction to Sociology course helps you gain mastery of the basic principles of sociology. In this course, you will learn a variety of topics, including sociological theory, cultural deviance, social interaction, diversity, stratification, education, technology, and health in modern society. You will also have the opportunity to demonstrate the application of these topics in sociology to everyday situations.
  • Microeconomics
    Sophia's Microeconomics course helps you thoroughly understand the principles of economics related to the behavior of individuals and firms in making decisions on the allocation of resources. You will learn the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy and how to evaluate decisions with an economic lens.
  • Macroeconomics
    Sophia’s Macroeconomics course helps you thoroughly understand the principles of economics related to the economic behaviors on a national and international scale. You learn the role of fiscal and monetary policy, how broad market systems and the business cycle work, as well as analyze the reasons for and against government interventions in the economy.
  • Project Management
    Sophia's Project Management course takes you through the life cycle of managing a project, from designing the scope to completing the project and celebrating your success. Along the way you will gain applied experience with project planning as well as managing project resources and risks.
  • Introduction to Business
    Sophia's Introduction to Business course helps you understand the fundamentals of business. In this course you will explore the environment of business, the art and science of marketing, what successful management of human resources looks like, and the basics of business finance. As you learn about these topics you'll be exposed to examples of how these basic concepts apply to big, small, and even entrepreneurial companies.
  • Accounting
    Sophia’s Accounting course helps you master the fundamental principles and procedures of the modern practice of accounting. You will gain practical experience with bookkeeping and preparing financial reports within the context of operating a sole proprietorship.
  • Visual Communications
    Sophia’s Visual Communications Pathway helps you gain mastery of the basic concepts of visual design helping you apply these concepts in context. In this Pathway, you will explore visual theories of communications and key elements and principles of design, with an emphasis on color, typography, and layout. In this Pathway, you will learn how to analyze a visual design and will understand the role that visual designs play in today’s society.
  • Introduction to Art History
    Sophia's Introduction to Art History course helps you gain mastery of the basic art history elements of the Western world from prehistoric to modern times. In this course, you will explore art exhibits, analyze buildings and architecture, and examine art in everyday life.
  • Approaches to Studying Religions
    Sophia’s Approaches to Studying Religion Pathway helps you gain mastery of the basic concepts integral to the study of religion and understand how these concepts apply in real world situation. In this Pathway, you will explore key components of religions as they apply to a range of different belief systems and will explore the role of religion in modern society.
  • Conflict Resolution
    Sophia's Conflict Resolution course helps you gain mastery of the basic concepts of conflict resolution and how to apply these concepts in real world situations and your own lives. In this course, you will explore key theories and skills associated with conflict resolution in a variety of contexts, including organizational, intercultural, family and interpersonal.

Career and Technical Education

  • Business Applications1
  • Introduction to Business and Marketing
  • Intermediate Business and Marketing1
  • Information Technology Applications1
  • Principles of Information Technology
  • Principles of Business, Marketing and Finance
  • Introduction to Health Science1
  • Intermediate Health Science1
  • Principles of Health Science

1Course is 0.5 credit

I am more confident in math because I speed through every lesson with ease. -Sophia, grade 7
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